Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a critical supplemental program to the Social Security system that provides modest financial assistance for people who are unable to work enough to meet their basic needs. Examples of older adults who may qualify for SSI include an 80-year-old low-income retired couple with unexpected medical costs who are facing homelessness, a 50-year-old person who is blind, with no savings, and a 70-year-old single woman with little to no Social Security benefits. The program is a key anti-poverty program, but its outdated rules and requirements keep out many of the people it is supposed to help.

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Kate Lang
Director, Federal Income Security

Kate joined Justice in Aging’s Income Team in December 2012 and leads our advocacy in Washington DC to improve the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. She was formerly staff attorney at the Legal Aid Bureau in Riverdale, MD where she was an advocate for low-income older adults and persons with disabilities. In her previous positions, Kate worked as an attorney at the National Legal Aid and Defender Association and Bread for the City Legal Clinic in Washington, DC as well as at Doherty, Cella, Keane and Associates, LLP. She has also served as a staff attorney for Legal Services of Northern California. She received her B.A. from Oberlin College and her J.D. from Fordham University School of Law. She also has a master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania in teaching English to speakers of other languages. State Bar Admission: California.

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